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Lost Traffic Ticket in Vermont

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If you lost your VT traffic ticket, you'll need to contact the Vermont Judicial Bureau or the police department in the county where you received it. To get lost ticket information, you may be asked to provide your driver's license number, license plate number, and birth date.

Continue reading this page to learn about lost traffic tickets in Vermont.

Contact the Vermont Judicial Bureau

Perhaps the easiest way to start your traffic ticket search—especially if you don't remember where you received the citation or the traffic court handling the ticket—is by contacting the Vermont Judicial Bureau. The Judicial Bureau handles traffic violations in Vermont and as long as they have your violation on file, they can provide you with the information necessary to respond to your violation.

If the Vermont Judicial Bureau doesn't yet have your traffic ticket details, contact the law enforcement agency that issued your citation.

Your VT Traffic Ticket Details

Once you contact the agency that has your VT traffic ticket information, find out:

  • If your violation requires a court appearance.
    • Ask where you must appear and for the date and time.
    • Consider consulting a traffic ticket attorney, as mandatory court appearances generally mean you're charged with a more serious offense.
  • Specific citation details, including the:
    • Violation(s) of which you've been charged.
    • Citation number. You'll need this to pay online or by mail.
    • Ticketing police officer's name.
    • Law enforcement agency handling the citation.
  • All payment information, including:
    • Your exact fine, and any related fees or surcharges.
    • Your Waiver Penalty (applicable if you plead "admitted" or "no contest").
    • The payment options and methods for which you're eligible.
    • Whether you're eligible for a payment extension.
  • Your response deadline.
    • This is your deadline to plead “admitted" or "no contest" and pay the applicable fines and fees, or plead "declined" and schedule a court hearing.

Remember, you have 20 days to respond to your violation, so it's crucial you gather this information as soon as possible.

Decide How You'll Plead to Your VT Ticket

Once you find traffic ticket information, determine how you want to plead to your VT traffic violation. In Vermont, you have three options:

A plea of "admitted" or "no contest" requires you to pay the associated Vermont traffic ticket fines. You'll also face additional points on your VT driving record. For more on this, check out our page on Paying Your Vermont Traffic Ticket.

Your other option is to submit a "not guilty" plea and dispute your VT traffic violation before a judge. In this case, you may want to contact a local traffic ticket attorney to get more information about how to handle your traffic ticket case. Traffic ticket attorneys can help with any kind of traffic violation, including red light tickets and speeding tickets.

There's also an option to take a court decision one step further by appealing your traffic citation. To learn how, visit our page on Fighting Your VT Traffic Ticket.

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