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  • Motorcycle License in Utah

    New Motorcycle Restrictions

    If you were born to be wild, you still need proper training and testing to be licensed to ride a motorcycle in the state of Utah. Motorcycles are inexpensive to operate and fun to drive, but for you, the vulnerable rider, they are more dangerous than cars and require different skills and knowledge to operate safely in traffic.

    You must receive a special license from the Utah Department of Public Safety, Driver License Division (DLD) to legally ride a motorcycle. If you already have a Class D driver license for regular passenger vehicles, you will need only a motorcycle (M) endorsement.

    Rules are now in place that require motorcycle riders to be restricted to riding a motorcycle based on the cc size of the motorcycle they are tested on. In other words, if you tested on:

    • a motorcycle 90 cc or less, you can only ride a motorcycles/scooters 90 cc or less.
    • a motorcycle 249 cc. or less, you can only ride a motorcycles/scooters 249 cc or less.
    • up to 649 cc or less, you can only ride a motorcycles/scooters 649 cc or less.

    If you are tested on a motorcycle of 650 cc or greater, there will be no restrictions. You will be able to ride any size motorcycle.

    Learners Permit Restrictions

    For the first 2 months your motorcycle learner permit is issued, you cannot ride a motorcycle on a highway with a posted speed limit of 60 miles per hour or more. You also cannot carry passengers or ride at night after 10 P.M. and before 6 A.M.

    Month 3 through 6, from the date you motorcycle learner permit is issued, all restrictions are lifted.

    How to Get a License

    There are two ways you can get your license.

    Option 1: Go to Your Nearest DMV Office:

    • Head down to the Utah DMV Office.
    • Fill out a drivers license application form.
    • Bring in the required documents you need to get a new drivers license. (Since you're adding a motorcycle endorsement to your drivers license, you are in essence getting a new license.)
    • Pass the tests.
    • Pay the fee of $9.50.

    Completing these steps will allow you to operate any car or motorcycle. But you're not done yet. Once you're ready you need to come back and take the motorcycle riding (skills) test. Bring your own motorcycle to the office along with your permit and once you successfully pass the riding (skills) test you receive your completed motorcycle endorsed drivers license within 3 to 4 weeks in the mail.

    Option 2: Take a Beginning Rider Course

    • Perhaps the safest and easiest way to get your motorcycle endorsement is by taking an approved Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) Beginning Rider Course (BRC).
    • Once you have completed the course, take the certificate of completion into your nearest drivers license office.
    • Fill out a drivers license application form.
    • Bring in the required documents you need to get a new drivers license. (Since you're adding a motorcycle endorsement to your drivers license, you are in essence getting a new license.)
    • Pass the tests.
    • Pay the fee.

    NOTE: By completing the BRC, you will NOT have to take the riding (skills) test portion of the exam.

    Why Enroll in Beginning Riding School?

    Formal motorcycle training helps keep you out of trouble by educating you on the most effective―but not necessarily intuitive―responses to dangerous situations like these that you will encounter every day.

    Other Benefits to Training

    Not only does the Driver License Division waives the riding portion of the licensing exam for graduates of a basic riding course, insurance companies usually provide better rates for graduates, and some motorcycle manufacturers will help you with the tuition.

    About The Course

    This course is a 15 hour course with 5 hours of classroom training and 10 hours on the motorcycle. The schools provide motorcycles and helmets and use 150 cc and 250 cc motorcycles for training.

    NOTE: If you take the riding course on one of the school's motorcycles, you will be restricted to riding that size when you get your license. So, if you want to ride a motorcycle that is larger than what you tested on with the school, you will need re-test with the school or with driver license on your larger motorcycle.

    Approved Motorcycle Riding Schools

    The following schools offer approved riding courses.

    Motorcycle Schools (Call for fees and information):

    • Dixie College
      225 South 700 East
      St. George Utah 84770
      (435) 652-7664
    • Salt Lake Community College Redwood Campus
      4600 South Redwood Road
      Salt Lake City, Utah
      (801) 957-5200
    • USU/CEU or Utah State University/College of Eastern Utah
      Price, Utah
      (435) 613-5440
      Classes also taught in Vernal and Moab
    • Utah Motorcyclist Association
      (801) 394-6564 or 1-888-743-3881
      Classes taught at Taylorsville and Murray High Schools, Ogden, and Provo.

    Note: These schools also provide an Experienced Rider Course (ERC). The course is 5 hours long and is designed for experienced riders that have logged over 2000 miles on their motorcycle. By taking the ERC you can be tested on your own motorcycle and once you successfully pass the test, you will get a riding skills test waiver card that you can use to get your motorcycle endorsement at your nearest driver license office. You must show your completion card (BRC) or (ERC) to the driver license office within six months of course completion to receive the riding skills test waiver.

    For information about motorcycle training courses,contact any driver license field office.

    And Make Sure You're Insured

    It is illegal to ride a motorcycle that is uninsured.

    In the state of Utah, the law states that any person operating a motorcycle must be able to immediately provide evidence of insurance for that motorcycle. Failure to do so may result in having to surrender your driver license. Any additional violations of this law can also result in you having to surrender the registration for your motorcycle. So make sure your insured.

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