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Lemon Law Attorneys in Texas

SUMMARY: Lemon Law Attorneys in Texas

The Texas Department of Motor Vehicles (TxDMV) refers to their lemon law as Lemon Aid. This may sound funny, but it's not funny when you purchase a new vehicle only to find it has a persistent defect. If your vehicle qualifies as a lemon and you are unable to resolve your issue and get your defect repaired, you can file a complaint or seek a lemon law attorney. If you choose to hire an attorney, you can actually get your fees paid by the manufacturer if you prevail.

NOTE: The content of this website is intended solely for informational purposes. It is not a source of legal advice and should not be used as such.

Why Hire a TX Lemon Law Attorney?

When dealing with a dealer or automotive manufacturer, you need to be properly prepared. An attorney will be able to tell you whether you have a lemon, will know exactly how to deal with lemon law issues, and can give you your best option to obtain a satisfactory settlement.

Some benefits of hiring an attorney include:

  • They know consumer rights.
  • Resolutions may come much faster with the help of an attorney than if you were attempting to handle the issue on your own.
  • An attorney's representation gives you peace of mind.

Essentially, an attorney with experience in the state's lemon laws acts as your expert and advocate for your rights. You have a much better chance of a successful outcome when you have someone who can guide you based on their expertise and expertise.

Is My Texas Vehicle a Lemon?

The state of Texas has very specific qualifications for what defines a vehicle as “lemon." However, note that you may have a lemon if:

  • Your new vehicle has a serious defect that impairs its use or safety.
  • The defect has caused your vehicle to go out of service for 30 days or more.

The specific details regarding what must occur for your vehicle to be a lemon are provided on our Texas Lemon Law page.

If your vehicle is a lemon, the manufacturer is required to EITHER:

  • Replace the vehicle.
    OR
  • Provide a refund of the purchase price (minus a reasonable allowance for use of the vehicle).

If your manufacturer is unable or refuses to repair your vehicle's defect, you can submit a complaint to seek repurchase or replacement. Continue reading to learn all about the state's complaint process for lemons.

How to File a Complaint

Here's how the complaint process works:

  • You file a Lemon Law Complaint Form (Form ENF-140) in addition to a $35 filing fee with the TxDMV.
    • You must also give notice to the vehicle manufacturer of a final opportunity to repair the issue.
  • The complaint will be reviewed by a case advisor for eligibility and completeness. An attempt to resolve the complaint via mediation will be made.
  • If, after mediation, the matter is still unresolved, you'll get a hearing with a hearing examiner where both you and the manufacturer can present your cases.
  • The hearing examiner will provide a final written decision within 60 days after the hearing closes.
  • Either you or the manufacturer may challenge the final order. To do so, you'll file a motion for a rehearing with the TxDMV.
    • If, after the rehearing, a party is still unsatisfied, they can file an appeal with the appeals court or a state district in Travis County.

Attempting to resolve a lemon law case can get tricky, and you might make certain statements or take actions that could harm your own case. For this reason, it can help you to hire a lemon law attorney who is very familiar with the state's laws on the matter and can make sure you get the compensation you deserve.

Hiring Your Attorney

When looking for a lemon law attorney in Texas, be sure to find one with experience.

Search for someone that is familiar with lemon law cases and knows all the details of the law.

Also, always remember to ask any questions you can think of upfront. If anything about the answers you receive makes you uneasy, continue your search.

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