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  • Suspended License in Oregon

    Driver’s License Suspension in Oregon

    In Oregon, the Driver and Motor Services Division (DMV) can suspend your driver’s license for several reasons, including not paying your traffic tickets, having too many traffic violations, failing to pay child support, and more.

    Read more to lean about Oregon driver’s license suspensions, reinstatement, and fees.

    About Your Suspended License in OR

    Your Oregon driver’s license can be suspended:

    • By a court.
      • The court can confiscate your driver’s license on the spot and return it to the DMV.
    • By the DMV.
      • A notice will be sent to you. You will need to surrender your driver’s license to the DMV on or before the day your suspension begins.

    Common reasons your driver’s license can be suspended in Oregon include:

    • DUI convictions.
    • Failure of or refusal to test for blood alcohol concentration (BAC).
      • Your license will be suspended by the DMV, regardless of a court conviction for DUI.
    • Failure to appear in court.
    • Failure to comply with a court order, including failure to pay a ticket.
    • Failure to pay child support.
    • Exceeding the limits of traffic violations or accidents (as laid out by Oregon’s Driver Improvement Program).

    Driver Improvement Program

    The Driver Improvement Program is meant to promote public safety. Under the program, your driver’s license can be put under certain restrictions or even be suspended if you have are convicted of several traffic violations within a specific amount of time.

    Minor Drivers

    If you are under 18 years old, your driver’s license will be under a 90-day restriction (you can drive for work purposes only) IF you have the any of the following before you turn 18 years old:

    • 2 convictions.
    • 2 accidents.
    • A combination of 1 conviction and 1 accident.

    If you have a 3rd conviction or 3rd accident, your driver’s license will be suspended for 6 months. This applies even if you turn 18 years old during the suspension period.

    Adult Drivers

    If you are 18 years old or older, you face a 30-day restriction IF you have any of the following in an 18-month period:

    • 3 convictions.
    • 3 accidents.
    • A combination of the above totaling 3 incidents.

    Your restriction will limit you from driving between midnight and 5 a.m., unless you are driving to or from work.

    Your license will be suspended for 30 days IF you have any of the following in a 24-month period:

    • 4 convictions.
    • 4 accidents.
    • A combination of the above totaling to 4 incidents.

    Check Your License Status

    If you are concerned about your license status, or think you may be close to having your license suspended, you may want to order your Oregon driving record.

    Your driving record lists your driving history (including any tickets, accidents, suspensions, points, etc.). Because your driving can affect your car insurance rates and sometimes even your employment, it is a good idea to periodically check it.

    Check Your Driving Record Today

    Make sure your license isn't in danger of suspension. Check your driver history with an updated Oregon driving record.

    OR Suspension Hearings and Appeals

    If the Oregon DMV suspends your license, you may be able to contest the suspension in an administrative hearing.

    Your suspension notification from the DMV will indicate whether you are eligible for an administrative hearing.

    Cases commonly handled through administrative hearings involve alcohol-related suspensions that did not arise from a DUI court conviction.

    You can request a hearing:

    • Online at the Oregon DMV website.
    • By fax to the DMV Hearings Case Management Unit at (503) 945-5521.
    • By mail to:
        DMV Hearings Case Management Unit
        1905 Lana Ave. NE
        Salem, OR 97314

    Required Information

    Include the following information in your hearing request:

    • Your name.
    • Date of birth.
    • Your mailing address.
    • Phone number.
    • Driver’s license number.
    • Vehicle registration plate or title number.
    • Name and contact information of your attorney.

    Hardship Permits in Oregon

    For certain suspensions and revocations, you may be able to obtain an Oregon hardship or probationary permit that allows you to drive:

    • To and from work.
    • For work purposes.
    • To attend alcohol or drug programs.
    • For medical purposes.

    To apply for a hardship permit, you must:

    To ask about your eligibility, call the DMV at (503) 945-5000.

    Reinstate Your Oregon Driver’s License

    To reinstate your suspended license, you will need to fulfill the requirements associated with your suspension.

    To find your reinstatement requirements, check your suspension notice. You’ll see a suspension code in the top right corner (e.g., “S001”).

    Once you have your code, you can visit the Oregon DMV website to determine the requirements for your code.

    You can also inquire to the DMV about your requirements:

    • Online.
    • By phone: (503) 945-5000.
    • By mail:
        DMV Headquarters
        1905 Lana Ave NE
        Salem, OR 97314

    NOTE: Additional requirements may apply, based on the suspension and the laws surrounding the offense, as well as whether you get an additional suspension or revocation from the court.

    Fees for Suspended OR Licenses

    In order to reinstate your suspended license, you must pay a $75 reinstatement fee.

    You can pay your reinstatement fee at your local DMV office with cash or a personal check.

    The OR DMV will not accept credit or debit cards for reinstatement fee payments.

    NOTE: Additional fines associated with a conviction may apply.

    Payment Plans

    The Oregon Department of Revenue has partnered with circuit courts to help drivers reinstate their licenses with the help of a payment plan.

    For more information on payment plan options, please visit the Oregon DOR website.

    CDL Suspensions in Oregon

    Common reasons for Oregon CDL disqualifications include:

    • DUI offenses.
    • Railroad crossing violations.
    • Driving recklessly.
    • Out-of-service order violations.

    For more information, check out our Commercial Drivers section.