Title Transfers in Nevada

How to Transfer a Vehicle Title in Nevada:
  1. Have the seller assign the title to you and obtain a lien release, if applicable.
  2. Get an emissions inspection and VIN inspection, if required.
  3. Complete the appropriate application form.
  4. Provide proof identity and NV auto insurance.
  5. Bring all paperwork and payment for your titling fee to the DMV.

Keep reading for further details on Nevada title transfers.

New Nevada Residents

Upon moving to Nevada, it is strongly recommended—though not required—that you transfer your title with the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles. This will prevent any mishaps or confusion if you sell or trade in your car in the future.

Titling and registration happen at the same time, and you have 30 days after establishing residency to register your vehicle with the DMV.

To transfer your out-of-state vehicle title to Nevada, you will need to:

  • Complete an emissions inspection, if your vehicle will be based within the central or metro Reno and Las Vegas areas.
    • Visit our Smog Check page for details on Las Vegas emissions inspection requirements and exemptions.
  • Have your vehicle identification number (VIN) inspected.

Submit to your local DMV office:

Your new title will be mailed to your new Nevada address.

Buying or Selling a Vehicle

The responsibilities for transferring ownership of a Nevada vehicle vary based on whether you are:

  • Buying a vehicle from a dealership.
  • Purchasing from a private seller.
  • Selling your vehicle to another person.

Buying from a Dealer

If you bought a car from a dealership, the dealer is required to submit all titling paperwork to the DMV within 30 days. You will receive your title in the mail.

If you financed your vehicle, the title will be sent to the lienholder.

You will still need to visit the DMV in order to complete your vehicle registration.

Buying from a Private Party

When purchasing a vehicle in Nevada from another individual, you'll need to obtain from the seller:

  • The original title, assigned over to you with signatures from all listed owners.
  • Proof of a lien release, if applicable.
    • The vehicle cannot be sold until the lien has been satisfied.
  • Proof of emissions testing, if one was completed within the last 90 days.
    • If the seller has not had the vehicle tested, and you are in one of the required testing areas, you will need to do so before titling and registering it.

Once you have all necessary documents, take them to your local DMV location along with:

Selling a Vehicle in Nevada

As the seller of a Nevada vehicle, you'll need to:

  • Remove the license plates from the vehicle.
    • You may either keep these or surrender them to the DMV.
  • Assign the title over to the buyer.
    • If the title is marked with “AND," all owners listed must sign.
    • If it's marked with “OR," a single owner's signature is sufficient.
  • Fill out a Bill of Sale (Form VP104) and keep with your records.
  • Provide the buyer with proof of a lien release, if applicable.
    • You cannot sell them the car with a lien still on it.
  • Notify the DMV of the sale with the Online Vehicle Resale Notification portal.

What if I've Lost the Title?

For vehicles 9 years old or newer, you will need to apply for a duplicate title before closing the sale with the buyer.

If the vehicle is over 9 years old, you and the buyer can transfer the title by completing:

Gifting, Donating, or Inheriting a Vehicle

Gifted or Donated Vehicles in Nevada

Selling a vehicle to a family member or giving one as a gift in Nevada is handled like a private party sale and no additional requirements or forms are needed.

Inherited NV Vehicles

After the death of a vehicle owner, the car passes to the named beneficiary on the title.

If you are the beneficiary, you'll need to:

You may bring the above items to your local Department of Motor Vehicles office, or mail them (see steps for “Designating a Beneficiary" below) ONLY if you are not planning to register and drive the vehicle. If you wish to drive it, you must go in person and complete the titling and registration.

Designating a Beneficiary

If you wish to amend your Nevada vehicle title to designate a beneficiary upon death, you'll need to submit to the DMV:

  • The vehicle title.
  • A completed Transfer on Death Application (Form VP239).
  • If there are multiple owners on the title separated by “AND," all owners must sign. If separated by “OR," a single owner may sign.
  • Payment for the title fee.
  • If paying by mail (see below), you may send a check, money order, or Payment Authorization (Form VP-205).

You can turn in these documents:

  • In person to your local DMV branch.
  • By mail to:
    • Department of Motor Vehicles
    • Title Processing
    • 555 Wright Way
    • Carson City, NV 89711

If paying by mail, make sure to include a letter of explanation that includes your:

  • Full name and address.
  • Daytime phone number.
  • License plate number.

Titling Fees in Nevada

Basic fees for titles in Nevada are as follows:

  • First-time Nevada title: $29.25.
  • Title transfer: $21.
  • Duplicate title: $21.
  • Title processing fee: $8.95.

Additional processing fees may apply. You will also be responsible for paying required registration fees.

Removing Liens from a NV Title

After you've paid of a loan on your car, the lienholder should send you the title reflecting the satisfaction of the lien. Complete the “lien" section on the title, and write “none" where it indicates a lienholder.

If the lienholder did not have the title, they can complete and send you a Lien Release (Form VP186).

Submit all documents, along with payment for the $21 fee, to the DMV:

  • In person to your local DMV office.
  • By mail to:
    • Department of Motor Vehicles
    • Title Processing
    • 555 Wright Way
    • Carson City, NV 89711

You should receive a “clear" title with 8 weeks.

Duplicate Nevada Title

If your vehicle title was lost or damaged, you can apply for a replacement quite easily.

Complete an Application for Duplicate Nevada Certificate of Title (Form VP012) and have it notarized. Then either bring it, along with payment for your duplicate title fee, to your local DMV location, or mail it to the address listed on the form.

If there is a lien on your vehicle, your lienholder must be the one to apply for the duplicate title on your behalf. Contact your lender for information.

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