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Traffic Ticket FAQ in New Hampshire

If I can't afford my fine, can I arrange for a payment plan?

This option is not available.

I entered a not guilty plea through the mail, but never received a court date. What should I do?

After entering a not guilty plea, you should receive a court date notice in the mail within about 6 to 8 weeks. If, after eight weeks, you have not received a notice, call the Bureau of Financial Responsibility at (603) 227-4010.

What is a pretrial conference?

After receiving your not guilty plea, the court will mail you a pretrial conference date. This gives you the chance to meet with the prosecutor and try to reach an agreement. This may mean changing your plea in return for reduced or dismissed charges. If an agreement cannot be reached, your case will go before a judge on another day.

Can I reschedule my court date?

You must file a written motion with the court for a continuance (new trial date). There is no guarantee that the court will honor your request. The more advanced notice you provide, the better your chances. You can also inquire about having a traffic ticket attorney to stand in for you.

What happens if I don't appear on my scheduled court date?

The court will issue you a fine by mail. If you fail to pay the fine, the DMV, by order of the court, will suspend your NH driver's license.

After submitting a not guilty plea by mail, can I change my plea?

If you want to change your plea to guilty or nolo contendere, you will need to submit the traffic fine to the presiding court. Depending on the court, you may be able to pay in person, by mail or by phone. Call the court for assistance.

I mailed my payment one day before the suspension date. Can I still get suspended?

Yes. The state does not go by the postmark date.

I lost my ticket. What do I do?

The Bureau of Financial Responsibility will accept a written statement in lieu of a citation. Learn what information to include on your citation in our Lost Traffic Ticket section.

Will I get points on my driving record if ticketed for a traffic violation?

If cited and convicted of breaking a traffic law, the DMV will assign points to your driving record. Depending on the violation, you may receive between 1 and 6 points. The more severe the violation, the higher the point total. Keep in mind that drivers with accumulated points can take a driver improvement program to reduce points.

How many points am I allowed before the state suspends my New Hampshire driver's license?

Point totals and suspension lengths are dependent on age:

Drivers Younger Than 18 Years Old

  • 6 points in 1 calendar year―up to 3 months suspension
  • 12 points in 2 consecutive years―up to 6 months suspension
  • 18 points in 3 consecutive years―up to 1 year suspension

Drivers Between 18 and 20 Years Old

  • 9 points in 1 calendar year―up to 3 months suspension
  • 15 points in 2 consecutive years―up to 6 months suspension
  • 21 points in 3 consecutive years―up to 1 year suspension

Drivers 21 Years Old and Up

  • 12 points in 1 calendar year―up to 3 months suspension
  • 18 points in 24 months―up to 6 months suspension
  • 24 points in 3 consecutive years―up to 1 year suspension

Can I do anything to remove points on my driving record?

Depending on the circumstances, the state may allow you to enroll in a driver improvement course to remove 3 points. The course must be state-approved. Learn more in our Point Reduction page.

Why should I hire a traffic ticket attorney?

Should you decide to challenge your traffic citation in court, legal counsel might improve your chances for a favorable outcome. This could mean reduced charges, or even a dismissed ticket. Depending on the circumstances, this in turn could keep points off your driving record, spare your NH driver's license from getting suspended, and maybe even prevent a spike in your car insurance rates. Consult a traffic ticket attorney to see if this route makes sense for your case and your wallet.

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