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  • Ticket Fines and Penalties in Missouri

    Missouri Traffic Ticket Fines and Costs

    Fines vary across the state by county and municipality. For example, getting cited in St. Joseph for a prohibited turn won't cost the same as it would in Columbia. In addition, many counties and municipalities also may tack on additional fees.

    Pay Ticket
    (Plead Guilty or No Contest)

    • Pay the fine
    • Option to plea bargain penalties
    • Incur points on your driving record (could lead to license suspension/revocation)
    • Possibly incur increase on auto insurance rates
    • Possible option to take Driver Improvement Program (DIP) to reduce points

    Learn more about
    Paying your Traffic Ticket »

    Fight Ticket
    (Plead Not Guilty)

    • Contest traffic ticket via trial
    • Choose to represent yourself or hire an attorney
    • Possibly lose option to plea bargain for lesser penalties
    • No penalties if found guilty, but must pay court/attorney fees

    Learn more about
    Fighting your Traffic Ticket »

    Auto Insurance Rate Increase

    In addition to the traffic ticket fine, you may also experience a jolt in your auto insurance rates. You, of course, always have the option to counter any rate increases in your car insurance coverage by shopping for a new provider. You can compare rates from a number of major auto insurance companies from a our Car Insurance Center page.

    Compare Car Insurance Quotes in 3 Steps

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    MO Traffic Ticket Penalties

    Penalties carry long-term repercussions. Points on your driving record and the suspension or revocation of your Missouri driver's license can affect you for years.

    Should you lose your driving privileges, it's good to know the repercussions:

    Suspended License― The temporary loss of your MO driver's license. Reinstatement requirements are dependent on the reason behind the suspension.
    Revoked License―The termination of your Missouri driver's license. Once the revocation period has ended, you must reapply for a new driver's license. This requires retaking the knowledge and skill tests.

    Your driver's license may be revoked or suspended for:

    • Driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol
    • Refusing an alcohol or drug test
    • Failing to file an accident report
    • Providing false information when applying for a driver's license
    • Fleeing the scene of an accident
    • Failing to carry car insurance

    Consult Missouri's Driver Guide for a complete list of infractions with loss of license penalties.

    Missouri Points System

    Missouri assigns points to every traffic violation. The number of points depends on the infraction. The more serious the offense, the higher the number of points.

    If you accumulate 8 points or more in 18 months your license will be suspended for:

    • 30 days (1st suspension)
    • 60 days (2nd suspension)
    • 90 days (subsequent suspension)

    Your MO driver's license will be revoked for one year if:

    • You accumulate 12 points or more in 12 months
    • You accumulate 18 points or more in 18 months
    • You accumulate 24 points or more in 24 months

    Check Your MO Driving Record

    Always check your driving record after a ticket violation. Verify that all points are accurate so you have a clear assessment of where you stand. If, for example, you notice you're within one or two points of a suspension, you may inquire about enrolling into a Driver Improvement Program (DIP) with the intent of trimming your point total.

    Instant Missouri Driving Record

    Check for tickets, violations, and confirm your drivers license status with a instant self-check driving record. Each record may include suspensions, points, classifications, vital data, endorsements, expiration and driving status.

    Name:
    License Number: MO

    Drivers Younger Than 18 Years Old

    In addition to the infractions described above, you may lose your driving privileges for violating any of the restrictions associated with an instruction permit or intermediate license.

    Penalties for Missouri CDL Drivers

    You must notify your employer within 30 days of receiving a traffic violation. This applies to all scenarios, regardless of vehicle or state. So if, for example, you were ticketed for speeding in Vermont while driving your own car, you'd still need to alert your employer.

    Penalties for CDL drivers are steep. Not only can they affect your wallet, but also affect your career. For your convenience, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) offers a detailed list of traffic violations and penalties.