Search
Search & Choose State
  • Location:

  • Personal Injury in Michigan

    MI Personal Injury

    Michigan's roads―and those of the rest of the nation―are safer than they've ever been. There's been an across-the-board decline in accidents resulting in injury or death over the past decade, and every indication is that the trend will continue.

    Better safety equipment, vehicles that are engineered to help ensure the safety of occupants, and improved emergency medical technologies and procedures all deserve some credit for the downturn in the number of accidents producing fatalities and injuries.

    In Michigan, your no-fault includes Personal Injury Protection coverage, or PIP. That coverage will pay for injuries you, or the passengers in your vehicle, sustain in an accident. And while it's pretty inclusive, almost all policies have deductibles. And even then, it probably will not cover all of your medical bills, lost wages, or pain and suffering.

    A {I{Personal Injury Attorneys

    personal injury attorney} may be able to help you recoup some of the damages you've suffered. In many cases, it will depend on who's actually at fault in an accident, and by how much.

    If you're injured because someone failed to stop at a red light and ran into you, or you were involved in an accident with a drunk driver, for instance, that driver will be held responsible for the injuries you and any passengers in your car sustained. Their "fault" or negligence may be the basis of a lawsuit.

    In Michigan, even if you were partially at fault for an accident, you can sue the person who was more at fault. If you win, you'll recover a percentage of your loss.

    Once the liability for an accident is established, damages―the extent of your loss―can be established. Some of that loss might include:

    • Any medical expenses you've had or will have in the future.
    • Wages you've lost, even those due to having to travel to and from medical appointments.
    • Damage to your vehicle and its contents.
    • Physical pain and suffering.
    • Emotional distress.
    • Any permanent disfigurement or disability.

    Generally, you have three years from the date of the injury to sue in Michigan.

    If you are involved in an accident, there are a few things you can do to help, should you end up going to court.

    First, stay calm and make sure everyone in your vehicle is safe and not in danger of further injury―including you. Then, check the occupants of other vehicles and make sure they are not in any immediate danger. If there are any injuries, or you suspect someone may be injured, call 911 and tell them you need help.

    Then, collect as much information as you can about the driver of the other vehicle, the passengers, and any witnesses who may have seen the accident. Make sure you write it down. What happened is likely to be less clear a day after the accident than when it occurred.

    If you're unsure about the extent of the damage to either vehicle, or if there were injuries, make sure to contact the police.

    Finally, if you are injured, contact an attorney to help protect your rights and to make certain you get any award to which you may be entitled.

    Other Topics in This Section
    True or False

    Doctors don’t work with the same urgency to save your life if they know you’re an organ donor.

    True False

    False

    Every doctors first priority is to save your life regardless of your organ donation status.

    More about Organ Donation ▸ Become an Organ Donor ▸