Bill of Sale Form

Summary: Bill of Sale Form

Continue reading this page to learn about your state's bill of sale requirements and how to complete a bill of sale form, including details about title transfers when buying or selling a vehicle. You'll also find out how to protect yourself in a vehicle sale with a vehicle history report.

Bill of Sale Forms

A bill of sale is an important part of any vehicle sale; however, it is not the only thing you'll need to consider.

  • No sale is final until you complete a title transfer. Without this step finalized, the seller may be liable for fines and violations associated with the car.
  • As a buyer, BE SMART. Don't get saddled with a lemon. Order a vehicle history report to know for certain you're buying a gem.

Depending on the state you live in, your state's motor vehicle department may require you to obtain a bill of sale (see list below) OR it may be optional. Regardless of it being required or not, a bill of sale can be an important part of any vehicle transaction for both the buyer and the seller.

States Requiring Approved Bill of Sale

Many states require a state-specific bill of sale form. In this case, you must fill out the bill of sale form offered by the motor vehicle agency in your state. The list below lists states that require and provide a specific type of bill of sale form when you buy or sell a vehicle:

Generic Bill of Sale Form (Free & Printable)

If your state does not require or offer a bill of sale form, feel free to use our generic form, either to present to the state or to keep for your own records.

Who Needs a Bill of Sale?

Whether you are the seller or the buyer of the vehicle, you should never walk away from the transaction without a copy of the bill of sale. If you do not get a copy signed by both parties at the time of the sale, you leave yourself open to legal issues or other problems down the line.

Your bill of sale will generally include information about the transaction, including:

  • A description of the vehicle and its vehicle identification number (VIN).
  • Any warranty that may have been agreed upon.
  • The final sale price of the vehicle.
  • The name of the buyer and the seller.
  • The county and state in which the vehicle was sold.

NOTE: Certain states may have specific requirements of what exactly needs to appear on a bill of sale form. To find out what your state requires and to learn more about completing a bull of sale, please visit our Bill of Sale page.

Bill of Sale vs. Title Transfer

While a bill of sale is an essential part of the sale process, it generally does not prove ownership; only a title transfer proves ownership of a vehicle. In order to fully complete the sale, remember to transfer your title right away.

Vehicle History Report: Don't Sign Without It!

As a buyer, you should NEVER go into a sale without educating yourself about your potential purchase. If you neglect to learn about a vehicle's history prior to buying, you could get stuck with a lemon that will drain your money and time for years.

Vehicle history reports reveal information about a vehicle's past, including details about:

  • Previous owners.
  • Previous states where it was registered.
  • Past accidents and damages.

Before you even consider signing a bill of sale, you must make sure your purchase will be a good one. To obtain details on a potential purchase, check out our page on vehicle history reports/VIN checks.

Related Content

Provide Feedback