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    We at DMV.org hope you never have to read our Lemon Law guide (because it probably means your shiny new car has gone sour). But if you do, we've cut through the legalese in your state's statutes to educate you about your rights under the law―in language anyone can understand.

    Most states' Lemon Laws are spelled out in their legal code. But who wants to read through all that to find out whether your vehicle qualifies as a lemon? Our state-by-state guides will explain in plain English how Lemon Law claims are handled where you live.

    In most cases, your state will mediate between you and the automaker to get the vehicle repaired or replaced, or your money refunded. Don't get stuck with a car you can't drive. Instead, empower yourself with information.

    Use our state Lemon Law guides to find out how to keep good records, notify the manufacturer that the vehicle is flawed, file a Lemon Law complaint, and receive restitution.

    We'll tell you exactly what your state's laws say regarding what qualifies as a lemon, how long you have to file a claim, and what the burden of proof is. With a purchase this expensive, it's critical to make sure you don't miss the deadlines or omit required paperwork in your filing.

    Check your state's Lemon Law guide at the first sign of trouble―and protect your rights as a consumer.