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Renewing Drivers License for Drivers in the Military

Date posted: 07/20/2012

by Cara Hopkins on
in Drivers in the Military

The men and women of our armed forces have enough to think about without worrying about renewing a drivers license while serving in the military, so many states try to make the process as easy as possible. For license renewal specifics by state, check out our page dedicated to drivers in the military.

Military Personnel Driver License Benefits

If you are on active duty with the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, or any recognized branch of the US military, you may benefit from any or all of the following.

Extended Grace Periods

3346 Renewing Drivers License for Drivers in the MilitaryIn states where we civilians are only given 30 days after our license expires to renew, military personnel are often granted up to 90 days (but check your state’s guidelines to be sure!).

Non-Pictured Licenses

Because they can’t often make it back to their home state to have a new picture taken, some servicemen and women may receive a special military license without a photo. Once back home, though, military personnel usually need to go down to their local motor vehicle agency office and have a new picture taken within a few weeks or months of their return.

Exemptions and Fee Reductions

Some states charge military men and women discounted fees for renewing a driver’s license, and some states waive the requirement to get a new drivers license when relocating from state to state. In some places, the servicemember’s dependents also may receive discounts.

Military License Requirements

While requirements vary from state to state, typically, you simply need to show proof of active duty in order to qualify for military license benefits.

This may include:

  • A copy of your military ID card (front and back).
  • Documentation of active duty orders.
  • Proof of permanent residence in the state (such as your current license or ID).

As always, you will need to check your state’s specific laws (for military personnel) in order to be sure, and keep in mind that nearly every state revokes these privileges when a member of the armed forces leaves the military with anything other than an honorable discharge.

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About Cara Hopkins

Cara Hopkins has been a journalist and technical writer for more than 10 years. Cara is a member of the National Writers Union and has written extensively about the arts, restaurant culture, business, and education for both print and online publications. Cara loves to travel and maintains a personal Wordpress blog named Advice From a Real Live Woman. More articles by Cara Hopkins

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