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How to Find a Good Driver’s Ed Program

Date posted: 06/21/2012

by Melissa Crumish on
in Applying for a New License (Drivers 18+)

982 How to Find a Good Drivers Ed Program

Instead of looking for a good driver education program, focus on finding a drivers ed course approved by your state. This will cover “good” and guarantee that your Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) will recognize the course completion certificate.

We can’t stress enough how importance this is, especially if you reside in a state that requires proof of course completion to obtain a drivers license.

If your state mandates drivers ed and you enroll in a driving class that’s not sanctioned by the DMV, you will fail to receive credit. You will then need to re-enroll in an approved drivers education program, costing you additional time and money and delaying your ultimate goal, which is obtaining a driver license.

Finding Approved Driver Education Courses

Many states provide an online list of approved drivers ed courses; when in doubt, you can contact your DMV.

NOTE: In some instances, depending on your state, you may be instructed to contact the Department of Education – especially if you’re a teen driver.

When calling, be sure to ask if the DMV recognizes online driver ed. If given this option, do not accept an online driving school’s claim of being state sanctioned until confirming with the DMV. False claims are especially common with online programs.

Additional Driving School Considerations

Once you have a list of approved schools on your radar, here are some other things to consider:

  • Be leery of any driver education program that emphasizes passing the road test over teaching safe driving skills.
  • Check, if possible, the school’s training cars, computers, and classroom simulators. Consider a different program if say the training car is a 1993 Ford Fiesta sporting a Bonnaroo Music Festival bumper sticker.
  • How many hours of on-road training does the driving school promise? The more the better.
  • Think twice about enrolling in an “advanced” driving school that focuses on hazardous driving skills – skid control, high-speed turning – rather than everyday defensive driving techniques.

Have any driving school experiences you’d like to share? Leave a comment below for our online community.

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