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Delaware DMV Increases Certain Fees

By: Bridget ClerkinNovember 3, 2015
Delaware DMV raises handful of fines.

Routine trips to the DMV may start carrying novel price tags for Delaware drivers.
The First State’s Division of Motor Vehicles started charging higher prices for certain services on October 1. The uptick was ushered in by legislation passed this June, in order to collect $24 million for the state’s Transportation Trust Fund.

The increases hit a variety of DMV-related matters, including:

  • Car purchases.
  • Driving records.
  • Obtaining a title.
  • Registration and license renewal.
  • Replacing lost titles or licenses.

The raises were part of a comprehensive budget plan meant to address a $780 million deficit in the Delaware Transportation Trust Fund. It’s the first time in six years that the state has put any money back into the fund’s coffers.

All told, more than a dozen fees were raised by the legislation.

Specifically, Delaware residents can expect to be charged for:

  • Buying a new car—The fee was raised from 3.75 percent of the purchase price to 25 percent.
  • Getting your driving history—The cost is now $25, where it once was $15.
  • Obtaining a title—This now costs $35, when it used to cost $20.
  • Placing a lien on an existing title—This now costs $20.
  • Obtaining a duplicate license—This also now costs $20.
  • Renewing a license after it has expired—The fee was once $1.15, and is now $10.
    • NOTE: This fee is in addition to standard driver’s license renewal fees.
  • Obtaining a duplicate title—This price was raised from $25 to $50.
  • Late registration renewal—The cost is now $20, plus the regular registration fee.

Budget numbers indicate that the new car fee is intended to raise $12.5 million each year, which will go toward bridge and road improvements statewide.

The driving record fee—which hasn’t been changed for 11 years—is estimated to bring in $4.5 million annually for road improvements.

The new lien fee on existing titles is projected to generate $925,000 every year for new roads, larger improvements, and pothole repairs.

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