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Defend Your Driving: Submitting Your Defensive Driving Certificate of Completion

Date posted: 08/02/2012

by Kat Saks on
in Defensive Driving

2863 Defend Your Driving: Submitting Your Defensive Driving Certificate of Completion

If you’ve had your fair share of speeding tickets or other traffic violations, or if your drivers license is revoked or suspended, your state might require you to take a defensive driving course.

On the other hand, you might volunteer to go to traffic school to refresh your skills behind the wheel or to dismiss a pending traffic ticket.

No need to defend your reasons! A defensive driving course is usually a sound investment.

Depending on your states requirements, you can either complete a an online defensive driving course or one at a local traffic school.

In defensive driving school, you will get up-to-speed on the rules of the road and the latest techniques for safe and effective driving. You’ll also learn how to be cautious and responsive to your surroundings as you drive. No doubt, you’ll walk away from your defensive driving class with greater driving finesse.

Completing Defensive Driving School

Once you attend traffic school, shout it from the rooftops! Completion of a defensive driving course can have a positive impact on your records.

Before your class concludes, ensure that you obtain a certificate of completion. Then, provide a copy of your certificate to the following interested parties:

  • Your state motor vehicle agency. If your state required you to go to traffic school, then you must provide proof of course completion to the department of motor vehicles (DMV) in your area or the court that’s allowing you to take a course to satisfy a traffic ticket. If you attended a defensive driving course voluntarily, you still should submit your certificate to the DMV. Your schooling might improve your driving record.
  • Your auto insurance provider. Sometimes, attending a defensive driving school can improve your car insurance rates. Consult with your insurance provider for more information.
  • Your employer. If your job involves driving a company vehicle, your boss may be pleased to hear that you brushed up on your driving skills.

NOTE: Remember to find out which agency requires a copy for point reduction purposes. Sometimes this is the DMV; sometimes it’s the court.

Have you ever gone to traffic school? Share your experience with defensive driving courses in the comments section below.

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About Kat Saks

Kat Saks is a Denver-based writer and yoga teacher. She is also Firefly Partners' Client Solutions Manager. She blogs for DMV.org and shouts safe-driving tips to teens while driving the city streets. More articles by Kat Saks

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